🌹 Reviews: Asexual Erotics

As you can imagine this book discusses erotics with a focus on asexuality. It’s introduction focused on how the meaning of erotic had changed since Freud and how more modern queer theorists define it to mean more than simply the “sexual”. The great thing but about it hitting such a specific note is this discussion is all but nonexistent when it comes to social ace places. It asks what are we missing when we make ‘erotic’ be a single note. 

The book definitely is not an introduction to asexuality, it has a strong academic voice at times that make the points less clear than they could have been, but if you hang around queer spaces and think your life could use more theory, history, or a look at discussions of human development then this is definitely the sort of book to pick up. 

In my opinion the book also does a good job explaining how white women were rewarded for being “sexually liberated” while in the same decade people of color were and are punished in a number of ways for even the appearance of the same. In doing so, this book showcases that social change is not an absolute for all people, but varies along intersectional lines.

The book also goes over ‘political celibacy’, why it exists, how it often differs across race, and why it’s often grouped under asexuality history. It’s the first time I’ve seen a reason it’s so casually grouped and a spells out those reasons instead I’d just casually glossing over.

I feel like the chapters on childhood and ageism could have been combined for a stronger point instead of a more vague “this is a thing that people debate about”. I also found the epilogue featuring the discussion of violent entitled sexism felt like an afterthought more then an ending note. 

Despite my less than rave review for some chapters, overall the book left with me new things, ideas, often history nearly lost to time to consider when discussing how complete freedom can be gained for all. Here’s a few quotes I haven’t posted in our “ref” tag or on twitter that I enjoyed. 

“It is only through asexuality that a sufficient critique of compulsory sexuality as limiting to people across spectrums and different positionalities can be developed.” 

“Where there is queerness there is also asexuality.” 

If you’re curious to read more you can get your own copy here.

🌹 Reviews: Waking Up The Sun

Waking Up The Sun front loads a protagonist who has anxiety and has already learned ways to cope with it. It mentions magic almost right away too, but my favorite part of that is that a potion is considered magic instead of just having a spell go “cure” him. It’s a great bit of world building I wish more things had. Having a lead character who has to consider their racing thoughts and find medicine because that’s part of their basic needs is so a plot point, instead of a casual one off line. That’s amazing to see.

Around the 20% mark you see the consideration of being lost in the woods and having to wash your clothes. These are such small things that most writers just ignore because they think it will ruin— whatever. But these are the exact things that makes Waking Up The Sun real and something that feels new.

The only criticism I have of this was I thought the writing could be tighter. Sometimes I thought why is this being mentioned now, or at all. It may not be the best read for the sex repulsed for similar reasons but maybe this review can serve as your content warning.

With that said, this book is why I like to read from LGBTQ authors, generally found from small publishers. They have a number of important things that aren’t found elsewhere. Both men in the pairing are sweet. Awkward only in an realistic way instead of being an often sexist adorkable trope. I think my favorite thing is how much they check in with each other, ask if the other is okay.

[Learn more or buy your own copy here.]

🌹 Reviews: Our Bloody Pearl

Our Bloody Pearl cycles in ace places because Dejean is an ace of color and everything is respectfully done when it could have easily been a trash fire if written by someone who didn’t care about the community. But ace rep isn’t the only plus this book has going for it. The story ✨ shines ✨ as it talks about disability and healing from abuse. That’s where the heart of this novel is to me and almost every line about accepting your disabilities is a popular highlight for good reason. If you even passively like mermaids and pirates I’d absolutely recommend this book. Also, I love Dejean v much, kthxbuy!

🌹 Reviews: The Tyrant’s Tomb

Haikus as chapter titles are just fun.

As a pagan, particularly one with an affinity towards Apollo and Artemis. Rick Riordan’s Trials of Apollo have a special place for me. The first book in the series used to be my favorite, I wasn’t really into book three. But book four? Book four is really something wonderful. The way it talks about pain, abuse, and life. The fact that these are intended for middle-grade kids and have such an honest talk about such things gives me hope. While this isn’t really anything new for the PJO series, it’s nice to still see these things in a series that has so many books and so much attention. And if you missed out on the very first PJO book, maybe you can embrace anarchy like I did and start with this spinoff series.

I saw several people, including myself, miss that book four was even out in the first place so be sure to pick it up while it’s easy to find sales!

PS: Chapter 41 went hard with Aro Ace Rights 😭

 

New Year, New Books

A lot of people will make lists full of self help books around this time of year. And those books can be great, but at lot of times they aren’t really that life changing so instead of filling the little free library with books that might slightly changing someone’s point of view I decided to think of any book fiction or non-fiction that drastically changed how I go about things about life and the world around me. No need to count down from ten, because this short and sweet list won’t keep you long!

More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera

You know how titles are meant to encapsulate the whole book’s theme? Boil everything down to a moment or message? Nothing does that as well as More Happy Than Not. It’s a beautiful and sad book about identity and reminds me of a YA version of The Eternal Sunshine of a Spotless Mind. But unlike the story, I actually repeat this title back to myself on rough days. I remind myself if I’m more happy than not, then my troubles are just troubles. There isn’t anything that needs fixing.

The Dictator’s Handbook

Did I give you whiplash with that sharp turn? This non-fiction book subtitled Why Bad Behavior is Almost Always Good Politics is something I think back on a lot these days. Every time something weird and “un-presidented” happens I think about the stats laid out in this book and what it can mean for (us). If you can’t afford a copy right now, check out these two video summary of sorts: Rules for Rules and Death & Dynasties.  No matter what party you are, no matter what country you are from this book will change how you view political power and how those with it gain it and often keep it.

This chart stuck with me the most after reading the book. Maybe it was timing, maybe it was wishful thinking. Either way I find it such a simple and interesting stat collection. Other gems in the book is discussing how the Art of War shouldn’t be your reference for non-war things.

Review: Culture’s Skeleton by Adam P. Knave

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Culture’s Skeleton by Adam P. Knave

First off, the paperback is such a small, cute, and perfect size.

Culture’s Skeleton has the vibe of Hitchkicker’s Guide to the Galaxy while having its own voice. Things in Mur work by their own rules and Mur is really its own character. A lesser writer might have made characters from different time periods tropes of that era, but instead readers get a feeling of how people are connected despite where (or when) they are from. If you are looking for something with a lot of style and heart look no further!

Nemesis Series Review 1 & 2!

Today I’m reviewing two books! Dreadnought and Sovereign both by April Daniels. Here’s a quick overview of the series before I give you my thoughts on each.

About The Book: Danny Tozer has a problem: she just inherited the powers of Dreadnought, the world’s greatest superhero.

Until Dreadnought fell out of the sky and died right in front of her, Danny was trying to keep people from finding out she’s transgender. But before he expired, Dreadnought passed his mantle to her, and those secondhand superpowers transformed Danny’s body into what she’s always thought it should be. Now there’s no hiding that she’s a girl.

Dreadnought’s murderer—a cyborg named Utopia—still haunts the streets of New Port City, threatening destruction. If Danny can’t sort through the confusion of coming out, master her powers, and stop Utopia in time, humanity faces extinction.

Dreadnought

That’s it, that’s my whole blackout poetry inspired review for Dreadnought. Kidding! This book shines by interweaving own voice experiences with a world where a kid picks up the mantle of a famous superhero. It also has the worst bad guys in any story I’ve seen in a very long time. There’s nothing redeemable about them, but since their motivations are so every day I found myself rooting for their downfall even harder.

sovereign

Dreadnought is back! I normally care most about the plot in sequels since when continuing a story the story is a really important factor. But here, I cared more about how Dreadnought was doing. And that answer makes up the majority of the book. It’s also nice that book 2 showed more community issues giving us a bigger picture of both the superhero and transgender world. There were several lines in this book that were simply brilliant and I stopped to think only a thoughtful author like April Daniel could have pulled them off. Villians continue to be the ~worst~ but to my delight, we also get another trans superhero, Kinetiq, who I love dearly.

I don’t want to spoil anything, but I’m pretty happy how this book ended and I’ll be among the first to nervously and hopefully read a book 3 when we get it.

As a series, I give these two ★★★★½ ! I’d suggest this series for anywho who has ever even vaguely enjoyed superheroes, burnt out on the “trend” or not this story has something unique and powerful to offer.