Hello World

When a technology company can buy your personal freedom Scott is a hacker ready to prove that a single voice can be a powerful weapon.

Scott’s skills as a surveillance expert are useful when he’s breaking down firewalls. But hacktivism isn’t enough; he’s going after the holy grail–UltSyn’s Human Information Drives, human assets implanted with cerebral microchips. After digging deeper into restricted databases, he discovers that those who enlist with UltSyn get far more than they bargained for. Plunged into a world of human trafficking and corporate espionage, Scott is determined to find his sister, no matter the cost. But when the information reveals the people closest to him have been working for UltSyn all along, he has to find her–before UltSyn finds him.

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Top Reviews for Hello World

Hello Queer World – Set primarily in London and continental Europe, Hello World takes Hacker Novels and kinda makes it do a 180. Our Protagonist, Scott, isn’t out to save the world. He’s out to get something back for his own cause. He’s a loveable rogue that occasional makes mistakes thanks to his narrow, blinkered view. No matter the path be took I always found myself wanting him to succeed because I knew he’d do the right thing in the end – I also found myself remembering to breathe.

Sonia, who we meet early in the book, goes against the Code. She’s the break away and possibly my favourite character for reasons I can’t understand. She’s witty, clever, funny and just the right amount of self conscious that you can relate with without feeling like it’s overkill. She’s Human and maybe the most human of all the characters we meet.

It isn’t JUST the cast of characters both major and minor who make this book what it is. It’s WHO they are. Almost the entire cast of haracters are queer. Scott, our Protagonist, is asexual and biromantic. Something he states openly several times throughout the book. Another Hacker has her wife and kids at home. Another is non binary. And the best thing? It is represented so well. At no point did I stop and go: “What the hell?” And shake my head. It’s wholesome and it’s warm and it’s home if home were a book.

However of you don’t like reading first person stories this might not be for you. OR you could give it a shot, you might be surprised. – 5 Stars From Gemma Finch